Style 101: Spanish Colonial Revival

1929 Richard Requa Spanish Colonial Revival | Photograph by IS Architecture
The Spanish Colonial Revival style includes a wide range of elements influenced by Spanish colonial architecture in the United States. The style’s bright stucco walls and red tile roofs have a distinctly Mediterranean flair that seems appropriate for the style’s Southern California origins, but revival architecture of this sort can be found throughout the country. […]

Read More

Style 101: Craftsman

Ocean Beach Bungalow | Photograph by IS Architecture
The Craftsman style developed out of the English Arts & Crafts movement of  the late 19th century. In 1862, a British artist and medievalist named William Morris took issue with the loss of craftsmanship and individual design that had resulted from the Industrial Revolution. In response, he founded the design firm Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. to […]

Read More

Style 101: Pueblo Revival

istock-14661970_adobe-building_s4x3.jpg.rend.hgtvcom.966.725
  The Pueblo Revival style is one of the few styles born in America. The style was directly influenced by Native American pueblo architecture and has been adapted to both private and public architecture. It works particularly well for multifamily residences, which recall the original multifamily nature of Native American pueblos. While the revival likely […]

Read More

Style 101: Monterey Revival

Walter J. and Grace Ogden-Ralph L. Frank House, San Diego, CA | Photograph by IS Architecture
The Monterey Revival style, named for Monterey, CA (where it is most prevalent) is one of the few styles born in America. In the early 18th century, Californians blended Spanish colonial and New England colonial styles into something new. These buildings were two stories, built of adobe, and featured prominent second-story balconies or two-story front porches. This […]

Read More

Style 101: Mission Revival

Burlingame Railroad Station, Burlingame, CA | Photograph by Rebecca McManus, 2016
The Mission Revival style was born in California in the early 1890s, when the California Building at the World’s Columbian Exposition was constructed in a style that recalled the Spanish mission architecture of California’s past. Mission Revival architecture was further popularized when the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific rail companies built depots and stations in […]

Read More